About sad decisions and reactions

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By wolf_

Ambassador_ (9727)

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06-01-2004, 13:22

And yet another great reason why wealthy authors should initiate their own publishing company.

By Sonic_aka_T

Enlighted (4130)

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06-01-2004, 23:48

It is MAXIMUM 70 years after the writer dies... The thing is that names, characters and titles (which we usually rip from games) are NOT protected by copyright... Only the code and/or un-altered graphics are...

The shit we usually rip when we make a remake of a game is protected by trademarks. Those last 15 - 25 years BUT are hardly ever applied for due to costs. Many game titles, characters and names are never trademarked due to high cost.

By anonymous

incognito ergo sum (109)

anonymous's picture

06-01-2004, 23:59

Art (in other words, graphics) is copyrighted too, so I'm pretty sure that includes character designs.
Game title's are indeed usually trademarked, but I don't see how names don't fall under normal copyright either.. Afterall, the names are part of the story.

By Sonic_aka_T

Enlighted (4130)

Sonic_aka_T's picture

07-01-2004, 01:03

Check the correponding sites... Names and titles aren't protected. All copyright does is protect what you literally made. If I write "Hello All!" you can't write that anymore... You're free to write "Hi All' tho... Same goes for graphics (yes, art). I can't rip a metal creature from SD-Snatcher and use it (unless I modify it enough) but I can make a metal creature of my own.

Now, if I were to make a smiley face (or even just one that looks like a smiley) I'm fucked... That's a trademark and that you can't mess with... This is why companies now do trademark all their new titles... Same goes for patents; but since both patents and trademarks are so absolute they last a lot shorter than copyrights.

Note tho, that in case of SD Snatcher only the code, music and some of the graphics would be protected. Not even the storyline would be since it's a rip off too... (Bladerunner) And this shows how weak copyright is in these cases. There was never any case against SD-Snatcher which was such an obvious (but good) rip off. Hell, the picture on the Snatcher manual looks like it came straight from Blade Runner. Even the guy looks like Ford.

So... Hail! to anarchy and for me everthing that's not blatant copying goes... There's nothing wrong with a nice SD-Snatcher remake and Konami wouldn't have shit of a case against you if you make it for an OBSOLETE system. (Nor would they give a crap) Now, if I were to make SD-Snatcher Advance... That would be a different story...

Unless ofcourse I would call it "KILL ROBOT" and would make graphics *like* theirs and music *like* theirs... Then they wouldn't have a case at all. (Like with Blade Runner)

By Bart

Paragon (1423)

Bart's picture

07-01-2004, 01:12


Now, if I were to make a smiley face (or even just one that looks like a smiley) I'm fucked... That's a trademark and that you can't mess with... This is why companies now do trademark all their new titles... Same goes for patents; but since both patents and trademarks are so absolute they last a lot shorter than copyrights.

Actually you're wrong. Smileys are copyright free. The original creator of the smiley did not want any money for it so he gave away the copyrights to everyone. Try Google, you'll find some articles on it. Smile

By Sonic_aka_T

Enlighted (4130)

Sonic_aka_T's picture

07-01-2004, 01:22

Heh... That's just too great to be true... Me and my dumb luck... Can I still change it to Bart Simpson? Too late? Ack...

I could ofcourse edit my post and ask what the hell you mean by smiley... But hey...

By Sonic_aka_T

Enlighted (4130)

Sonic_aka_T's picture

07-01-2004, 01:31

Actually you're wrong. Smileys are copyright free. The original creator of the smiley did not want any money for it so he gave away the copyrights to everyone. Try Google, you'll find some articles on it. Smile

Heh, actually... Not my dumb luck... According to abcnews.go.com/sections/us/WolfFiles/wolffiles158.html you are wrong. He didn't patent the smiley on time, that's why it's public domain! Ofcourse you'd still be half-right cause there is no patent on it... Maybe that why we see them so much.. (DUH!)

By anonymous

incognito ergo sum (109)

anonymous's picture

07-01-2004, 01:55

In Soul Calibur II there's a character that's BASED ON character designs by some dude. It has mentions of that all over the place, with (c) to the original dude, even though the character in the game has differences.
If something looks like something else close enough, it's a copyright violation. The difference between "Hi All!" and "Hi All" is just too small.

Note this changes from country to country. In japan, adding subtitles to a video made the subtitled video a 'new product', free from copyright. I don't know if that's still the case, but that's how it was years ago.

Calling SD-Snatcher storyline a Bladerunner ripoff is pretty broad, as that means you can call 80% of the cyberpunk genre ripoffs from eachother.

By Bart

Paragon (1423)

Bart's picture

08-01-2004, 23:36

>>Actually you're wrong. Smileys are copyright free. The original creator of the smiley did not want any money for it so he gave away the copyrights to everyone. Try Google, you'll find some articles on it. Smile<<

Heh, actually... Not my dumb luck... According to abcnews.go.com/sections/us/WolfFiles/wolffiles158.html you are wrong. He didn't patent the smiley on time, that's why it's public domain! Ofcourse you'd still be half-right cause there is no patent on it... Maybe that why we see them so much.. (DUH!)

Hmzz. I must have read the romantic version of this story then :)

By Grauw

Enlighted (7840)

Grauw's picture

09-01-2004, 18:48

Guyver, well, as far as fansubs of Anime are concerned, I don't know whether it was like that in the past but it surely isn't anymore right now. Fansubs are (and always were, as far as I know...) illegal modifications and reproductions of copyrighted work. However, it didn't affect any commercial interests of the original authors, it actually helped them by making Anime very popular in the USA. Because of that they never objected against (er... my dictionary says they 'brooked') fansubs and actually have a respectful attitude towards them, even now, although there are currently a fair lot of groups not respecting the 'fansub code', meaning to stop fansubbing and distributing a series after it's licensed. Worst example the recent 'AnimeJunkies' incident. I'm afraid those groups may mean the end of the companies their positive attitudes towards fansubs.

~Grauw

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