MSX Demoscene

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By Abobo

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12-01-2010, 22:48

i saw right now Utopia from Daniel Vik and Vincent van Dam ....
it's an msx 1.... impossible... digitalized sound on msx 1....
msx was my computer when i was 12.... never saw nothing similar at the time.....
why noone has never used this great capabilities for games?

By hap

Paragon (2036)

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12-01-2010, 22:51

By wolf_

Ambassador_ (9883)

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12-01-2010, 23:03

A game is totally different from a demo.

- A demo is basically a moving visual show, while a game can be a static screen. As long as things are moving, things like course movements and big blocks can be acceptable, but for a game you want pixel work. For blocky yet moving by yours truly: Sphere and Wings. No MSX1 though, but what the heck..
- For a game you want a reasonably constant frame rate, because the player wants smooth operation of his character, a demo can really use 100% cpu time for some bits, because.. frankly my dear.. no one cares.. :P

By Abobo

Resident (63)

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12-01-2010, 23:14

ok , i don't want a demo into a game,
but i mean use this good scrolling and music system for games (for example),
msx 1 usually had a horrible scrolling system (remeber r-type or twinbee?),
music was bad usually (i hear digitalized sound now in demos!!!),
it looks like a commodore amiga not like a 8 bit computer!!!

By hitchhikr

Rookie (19)

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13-01-2010, 02:45

In demos, everything that is displayed or heard is known/controlled and happens in a sequential way, in a game there's an unpredictable user input factor which makes it much more tricky to always dedicate 100% of the machine resources for a specific task as the game must be as responsive as possible all the time.

Playing digit samples takes a lot of processor time and consumes a lot of memory (smooth scrolling too) which may not be acceptable inside a game context.
Also back then, producing cartridges containing enough memory to hold those digit samples was probably more expensive (and digitizing such samples needed some devices which weren't as common as they are nowadays) + maybe programmers didn't know they could use such trick Smile

By NYYRIKKI

Enlighted (5837)

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13-01-2010, 03:36

Well... lately some demo'ish effects have appeared to MSX1 games as well... Burn Rubber and Malaika comes to mind...

By JohnHassink

Ambassador (5578)

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13-01-2010, 11:45

i hear digitalized sound now in demos!!!
Well, whoop-tee-doo, but not everyone's a big fan of kssshhh - ghghgh- Aaaaargh, Satannnnn!!! - ghghgh - kssshhh - black metal. Smile

By wolf_

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13-01-2010, 11:49

Yeah, often the technological idea/challenge is nicer than the practical result! Tongue

By FiXato

Scribe (1707)

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13-01-2010, 12:01

Yeah, often the technological idea/challenge is nicer than the practical result! Tongue

{o,o}
|) _ )
_"_"_
O RLY?

By Abobo

Resident (63)

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13-01-2010, 14:24

In demos, everything that is displayed or heard is known/controlled and happens in a sequential way, in a game there's an unpredictable user input factor which makes it much more tricky to always dedicate 100% of the machine resources for a specific task as the game must be as responsive as possible all the time.

ok , but i mean:
whatching great demo like Bold seems that msx 1 was really the best 8-bit home computer of his age (compared to c64 and zx spectrum),
but i remember that games conversion from arcade games wasn't really good, c64 games was better in graphics and music that msx 1 games!!
many times msx 1 games was ports of zx spectrum games, i mean why programmers didn't use all the power of msx 1?

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