BBC Computer Literacy Project Archive put online

Door Thom

Hero (583)

afbeelding van Thom

27-06-2018, 13:09

Not really sure if it's news worthy, so I put this here. There used to be a tv programme (broadcast by the BBC in the 80s) about microcomputers, especially the Acorn BBC. However, MSX is mentioned in some of them.

They've now put everything online.

https://computer-literacy-project.pilots.bbcconnectedstudio....
(should be free to explore for the next three months)

Direct link to results after searching for MSX: https://computer-literacy-project.pilots.bbcconnectedstudio....

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Van OmaiGodman

Resident (59)

afbeelding van OmaiGodman

27-06-2018, 18:52

Funny, I just watched the whole series on youtube a few days ago. It's quite interesting to see how people looked at computers back then Smile I hope I can get my hands on a BBC Micro one day, I think it's a very interesting computer.

Van jltursan

Prophet (2180)

afbeelding van jltursan

28-06-2018, 10:00

Yep, given its early birth date, it's very powerful. A really fast machine with a polished BASIC.

Van djh1697

Paragon (1409)

afbeelding van djh1697

28-06-2018, 13:05

I used one at school in the early 1980's. I was in my penultimate year when the school received a Research Machines 380Z, and ten BBC model B computers. BBC basic was great, it allowed user defined named procedures, amongst other things! It did not have micro$oft Basic, but to be honest only a handful of UK machines has M$ basic at that time. I learn't how to program on a BBC and a ZX Spectrum, before I got my MSX1. The BBC as well as named procedures, allowed calculated goto statements, i.e. goto (X*150), something missing from my MSX, I soon learn't how to get round things.

It had seven screen modes as i remember, including one that behaved like a teletext/bulletin board terminal, it only used 1k of RAM, when you used different screen modes the amount of usable RAM went down, something that was solved with MSX and separate VRAM.

No 3.5" disks at that time, they where 5.25" SSDD, although tape cassettes where used an awful lot. The MSX cartridge slot is great for expansion, the BBC had a multitude of expansion slots built in, and, unusual for the time a RS432 interface.

All good fun! I actually became good friends with the teacher when I left school. We are still on talking terms too, he was a close friend until i moved from the area.

Van Manuel

Ascended (15753)

afbeelding van Manuel

29-06-2018, 00:41

Very interesting videos Thom! Episode 3 contains footage of the never released VHD game Highway Star!

Van o.geerdink

Hero (543)

afbeelding van o.geerdink

06-07-2018, 13:23

The successor of the BBC Micro is the BBC Micro:bit

Also available for people outside the UK!

http://microbit.org

Van TomH

Champion (327)

afbeelding van TomH

13-07-2018, 20:07

djh1697 wrote:

No 3.5" disks at that time, they where 5.25" SSDD, although tape cassettes where used an awful lot. The MSX cartridge slot is great for expansion, the BBC had a multitude of expansion slots built in, and, unusual for the time a RS432 interface.

Pedant attack! The BBC Micro is such an early entry into the world of computers that its original and most popular filing system is single density, being based around the Intel 8271. Acorn later offered a double-density alternative but as well as being late it used more RAM.

Great machines though. My school was full of them, and I had the Electron, the cheaper spin-off.

Van OmaiGodman

Resident (59)

afbeelding van OmaiGodman

14-07-2018, 19:44

Yeah, to make the Electron competitive with stuff like the ZX Spectrum they had to cut a few corners and the result was a machine that was slower than the Beeb but at least it still had a decent keyboard (from what I've seen in videos on youtube the keyboard on both the Beeb and the Electron is actually quite nice, although pretty much anything is an improvement over the dead rubber keys of the Spectrum).

The Beeb and the Speccy are both on my wishlist though, although with the Speccy I might actually get myself a Harlequin board and solder it together myself for a compatible, yet more reliable computer than the original Spectrum LOL!

When I bought my C64 it came with a lot of extra stuff (mostly C64 powerbricks and joysticks) but it also came with two cases of Sinclair Microdrive tapes. Although they look interesting, apparently they're the most unreliable things in the world XD